It's been a long wait, but it has finally come together and we couldn't be happier!

Yellowstone National Park announced on the 30th of October that the North Entrance in Gardiner and the road between that entrance and Mammoth Hot Springs, also known as Old Gardiner Road, will be open for regular visitor traffic. With crews working continuously to get the road repaired as soon as possible, their hard work paid off.

The road was destroyed in the devastating flooding that took place four months ago on June 13th of this year.

The original date set to have the road repaired and back open was October 15th. Missing that goal didn't deter the hard work and once again the road is open. There are some reminders and updates that visitors should know.

  • Yellowstone reminds the public of everyone’s responsibility to use the road carefully to avoid accidents.
  • Steep grades and sharp curves exist and speed limits range between 15-25 mph.
  • There are no length or weight restrictions on the road (see exceptions [nps.gov]), however, oversized vehicles and vehicles with trailers must use caution in curves to maintain lanes.
  • After opening to the public, the road will continue to be an active construction zone. Drivers will need to use caution and watch for crews and heavy equipment.
  • During inclement winter weather, short-term (30 minute) closures may occur to allow for plowing.
  • Clean-up efforts will continue beyond Nov. 1 for as long as weather permits.- YNP/KBZK

The new road looks GREAT according to this YouTube video posted by bearmauled.

Grab the family and head up to the new road and make sure to stop and check out some of Montana's best restaurants and shops.

cc:KBZK

Yellowstone National Park Rebuilds After Historic Flooding

After catastrophic flooding damaged portions of Yellowstone National Park in June of 2022, major reconstruction was necessary to make the park passable again. The following are photos of the improvement projects at Old Gardiner Road and the Northeast Entrance Road. All photos are courtesy of the National Park Service, photographer Jacob W. Frank.

25 Mind-Blowing Photos of Devastating Flooding in Montana

20 Mind-Blowing Photos of Devastating Flooding in Montana